Economics

Advantage 42

Studies have shown that asphalt pavements are the most economic choice.

Pavement rehabilitation with rigid structures requires it to be dug up, whereas with asphalt structures, resurfacing and overlaying can be sufficient. Keeping the base intact is significantly cheaper and demonstrates that asphalt can be considered as “perpetual pavement”.

Researchers from the University of Kansas found that rural interstates constructed of other material cost three times as much to construct and maintain as similar asphalt interstates.
The Ohio results showed that the life-cycle costs for asphalt were less than those of the compared concrete pavements, with most of the savings in the 25 percent to 70 percent range.

In 2002 Benelux Bitume made an economic calculation for the ring around Antwerp. Only the initial investments were considered and a service life of 40 years. The work consisted of the renewal of 12 km highway and 30 km of side roads. Everything was broken up and renewed,

The proposed maintenance strategy was:

Asphalt:

  • Every year: minor maintenance
  • After 15 and 30 years: mill out of the wearing course and the upper binder course and renew them

Concrete:

  • Every year: minor maintenance (no major maintenance like renewing fill material in the joints was considered!).
  • After 40 years: concrete was broken up and renewed


From:
Cross, S.A. and Parsons, R.L.; Evaluation of Expenditures on rural interstate Pavements in Kansas, Kansas University Transportation Center, February 2002

Whole Life Costing Study Ring Antwerp by Benelux Bitume (2002), EAPA Winning with asphalt